Athens Christmas Divorce

How to handle Christmas in a divorce

How to handle Christmas in a divorce

Are you in the midst of your first holiday season after a divorce? We’re here to help. It can be very difficult to get through the holidays when someone is in a new relationship or has new family members in their life, but there are ways to make things easier for everyone involved. Here’s some advice on how to handle Christmas with kids in the wake of your recent separation:

This year is your first Christmas after a divorce. Let’s face it, the holidays are tough enough to handle as it is and now you have to juggle things like custody agreements, holiday calendars, and getting along with someone who you might not be on friendly terms with anymore.

We all know that the holidays can be a stressful time. Between family, friends, and work obligations it’s easy to get overwhelmed. Add in special events like custody agreements, holiday calendars, and getting along with someone who you might not be on friendly terms with anymore – it can be overwhelming! But remember: the holidays are about spending time with family. So make sure you’re spending time with your kids during this important time of year, even if it means putting aside some grievances or differences for the sake of making memories together.

Remember what matters most this season: spending quality time with those who matter most—even if that means not including everyone within your circle!

The whole situation can feel a little overwhelming so we’ve put together some advice on how to get through it.

There’s no way around it: the holidays are a tough time for divorced parents. And while you should do everything you can to keep the kids’ interests in mind and their happiness at the forefront of your thoughts, it’s important to remember that they are not responsible for making or breaking your holiday plans.

In fact, when parenting plans are discussed between parents during divorce proceedings, children often feel left out of the conversation because they’re not included in these conversations. To avoid this from happening with your child, try including them in discussions about how you’ll spend Christmas together as a family unit (or alone). You might ask them what traditions they enjoy most and which ones could be changed; as well as what activities they’d like to do during each day of Christmas break. By involving your child in this process—and showing him or her that his/her opinion is valued—you’ll go a long way toward helping him/her feel more secure about what he/she can expect from the upcoming holiday season.

Let the kids have their say in the schedule

It’s important to involve your children in the conversation. They have a say in the schedule, and they might not want to lose their traditions. They may also have a preference for one parent over another, which you should consider when creating your plan.

If you’re having trouble with your ex-spouse, it can help if you try to avoid arguing in front of them or about them; instead, keep calm and focus on what’s best for the kids.

Before you try to figure out who gets what day for the holidays, involve your kids in the conversation. Even if they’re very small, they might be attached to certain traditions. You don’t want them to feel like they’ve lost something from their childhood by splitting up holiday time evenly between both parents’ homes.

Before you try to figure out who gets what day for the holidays, involve your kids in the conversation. Even if they’re very small, they might be attached to certain traditions. You don’t want them to feel like they’ve lost something from their childhood by splitting up holiday time evenly between both parents’ homes.

For example, if it’s been a tradition in your family that you spend Christmas morning with your dad and his family and then later that afternoon drive over to see grandma’s house for dinner, consider doing two separate Christmases this year so that everyone can keep all those precious memories intact—especially the kids!

This doesn’t mean you have to spend every minute of every day with each other either; just make sure everyone feels like someone is taking care of their needs at some point during the Christmas season so no one feels left out or forgotten about altogether!

Try asking them what traditions or activities at each of their parents’ homes that they enjoy most and would miss if one of those houses were unavailable during the holidays. Let them know that having their opinions will help you come up with a fair plan.

The best way to handle this is by asking your children for their opinion. Many parents forget that their kids have a say in where they would rather spend Christmas.

It’s important not to make the decision on behalf of your kids, but instead, involve them in the process. This will make them feel more comfortable with whatever plans you come up with and help them understand why these decisions were made.

Plan ahead for new events

Planning ahead for new events

Planning ahead for new events is a good way to be more organized and prepared. A great way to do this is by creating a holiday calendar that includes all of the important dates for you and your family, including:

  • The date that presents are exchanged
  • Christmas Eve
  • Christmas Day & New Years

Conclusion

We hope this article has helped you to handle Christmas in a divorce. We know it’s tough but if you follow our advice, it can be made easier for everyone involved. Good luck!